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Seminole_Web2016

History I due to frontier encroachment and movedn 1753, a small band of Mvskoke (Creek)Indians, called the Okone, left Georgia into the Spanish territory of La Florida, and other Indians, the Cimarron (a Spanish word meaning wild), migrated from Alabama. The word was corrupted by the Okone Indians who pronounced it Seminoli. The Seminoles fought for their homeland and against the Indian Removal Act of the 1830s. In 1836, after decades of wars, several bands migrated to Indian Territory and settled on the Canadian River near their kinsmen, the Creeks. Upon arrival to Indian territory, the Seminoles settled near Ft. Gibson. The Seminoles traded fur, hunted deer, elk, buffalo and trapped beavers. They grew large gardens The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma is a federally- of corn, beans, pumpkin and sweet potatoes recognized tribe and has a special political and that stretched for miles. They also fished in legal relationship with the U.S. government. clear running creeks and gathered various (405) 257-6287 / www.seminolenation.com edibles in the forest. Located about three miles southwest of the After the Civil War, the Seminole’s land was present city, Tidmore had its beginning in reduced to boundaries that include present- 1893 when the Mekusukey Academy for boys day Seminole County. They began their was built. People moving into the area could second Seminole Nation with the Council not buy Indian land; thus, under such House in Wewoka. The Seminoles are a proud conditions, Tidmore grew slowly. people, dedicated to tradition. They have In 1895, a railroad was built through the maintained their annual Creek Corn Seminole Nation near the site of the present ceremonies, and talented members of the City of Seminole. When it was possible for tribe create both historic and contemporary residents of Tidmore to buy land, they art such as beadwork, paintings, finger woven discovered more of it was for sale where belts and silver ornaments. Seminole is now located. As a result, a Bank with Security! Four locations to better serve you Holdenville, Maud, Seminole, Wewoka 824 N. Milt Phillips 210 S. Mekusukey Seminole, OK 74868 Wewoka, OK 74884 303-Bank (2265) 257-5411 1701 E. Hwy 206 W. Wanda Jackson Blvd. Holdenville, OK 74848 Maud, OK 74854 (405) 379-2265 (405) 374-2265 Voice Access / Tele Banking (405) 257-2600 and (405) 303-2255 13


Seminole_Web2016
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